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Kaleidoscope - another type of candy!

Updated: 3 days ago

As a young toddler, I was given a small optical device, that displayed endless mesmerizing symmetric geometries when seen through light. I was amazed and curious how it worked, I pulled it apart spilling out the tiny bits of colored glass. What happened next, you can guess, I wanted to put it back together to continue enjoying the colorful visual displays. As an adult, I made my Kaleidoscope…


Kaleidoscope is an optical device consisting of mirrors that reflect images of colored glass bits in a symmetrical geometric design. The design of the geometric reflection changes endlessly by rotating the chamber containing the glass fragments. The name has derived from the Greek words kalos (“beautiful”), eïdos (“form”), and skopeïn (“to view”).


This simple construct never gets old as it embodies so many everyday concepts such as light, reflection, axis, symmetry, geometry, refraction, translation, rotation, transformation, scaling, motion, pattern, structure, design, balance, beauty, aesthetic…and more.


This humble device is powerful, displaying balanced images that are pleasing to the eye, beautiful and harmonized. Next to magic, Kaleidoscope describes the symmetry from so many perspectives, mathematics, geometry, science, nature, arts, architecture, design, and, why not, music. This is why we love it and are hooked to it, and why Kaleidoscope is the mind’s eye-candy of this Halloween Season.

These images are captures with IPhone through the viewer of our Kaleidoscope prototype.

This Halloween, we will give away 20 Kaleidoscope units to the kids in our neighborhood, Milway Meadows community. If you'd like to build it yourself or help your child on this learning process, we can also provide you with the kit-of-parts and instructions on how to assemble it. Note: Mirrors have sharp edges and should be handled with care. Some crafting skills are required.


"Kaleidoscope" Project was made possible by ALine Architecture architects, K. Toto, M. Flieger, A. Angjeli. Mirrors were cut by Precise Glass preciseglass.com

Please feel free to drop us a note, email: anila@aline-architecture.com or if you'd like to support our community art projects initiative, we welcome monetary donations of any size.


Thank you for your support!


ALine Architecture Team

2503 Lisbon Lane

Alexandria, VA 22306

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